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CMS

What Does ‘Website’ Mean to CMS Users?

The definition and concept of website will invariably differ depending on the demographic you’re questioning. Defined literally, a website is a connected group of pages on the internet that use unique addresses and routes on the network, which are based on internet protocols. But who can actually understand this kind of explanation? CMS has become the leading solution to building a website with relative ease, and has become a second home for bloggers worldwide. 

Some of the most widely used CMS tools include WordPress, Joomla, and Drupal. CMS users that depend on these tools must take a closer look at some important issues we will address.

CMS

Chances are you have one of these open right now.

Whereas business owners are going to view websites as a platform for making money, the typical CMS user is thinking more about everyday concepts like social media, news, or the latest baseball game. Whether you’re browsing the news to check out newsfeeds filled with baby pictures and your now happily married friends, chances are your criteria for a good website is going to greatly differ from that of, say, a CEO. Let’s take a look at 3 criteria that the average CMS user might take into consideration when certifying a website as fresh.

1. Content

Well, I think this one is a no-brainer. With the massive amount of available websites providing the latest content, it’s crucial to provide the most engaging and innovative content in order to retain visitors. Let’s face it, people today are extremely lazy and have an attention span of a few seconds. SEO is the name of the game.

Social media has become a huge player today and it’s here to stay due to its ability to provide constant and up to date breaking news from around the world. Sites like Buzzfeed and Upworthy also serve as valuable resources as they compile some eye catching and often times incredible stories to read about.

2. Speed, Ease of Use

Again, back to the short attention span that plagues the current generation. If a website is difficult to navigate or inundated by those irritating popups and ads, chances are users won’t be back. It’s like meeting a potential partner or going in for an interview. The first impression is the name of the game.

If a website takes 5 minutes to load, it’s like being 5 minutes late to an interview. It just shows that you don’t care or you didn’t make the proper preparations. By the way, if you’re still using IE please download Chrome or Firefox now.

3. Active Community

Reddit and Quora are two of the most popular communities around. The beauty of Reddit is that it is built on subreddits. This effectively allows you to navigate straight to the type of content you want to browse. Or you can simply navigate to the front page. Then you can browse the most popular posts regardless of category.

It’s a solid way to keep up with news as well. You can discover things or find an interest in something that you may not even knew existed. This is effective because people don’t want to have to root through irrelevant information (at least to them) in order to access the desired information.

Regardless of Demographic, Everybody Needs Website Security

As a whole, CMS users tend to look at websites in a more laid back manner rather than their strictly business oriented counterparts. However, this doesn’t take away from the fact that website security is of the utmost importance. Many CMS users tend to think that their site is safe since it’s not established or serves as an appealing targets. However, it’s these smaller up and coming sites that are often targeted. This is due to their highly visible vulnerabilities.

Regardless, a web application firewall is a must. Look no further, as Cloudbric is here as your one stop security service to ensure all that painstakingly created content doesn’t fall into the wrong hands. Get started today!

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“Website” Meaning for Startup CEOs?

You might hear a lot of CEOs saying, “My website is powered by WordPress”, “My website is everything”, or “My website is my entire business!” These are the most common answers from CEOs. Almost all startups operate their own websites. Many startup CEOs build their websites with CMS tools such as WordPress, Joomla, or Drupal. Those that depend on these tools really need to pay attention to what these are, if they have any hope to do business online.

Well, the actual definition of a website is a connected group of pages on the Internet that use unique addresses and network routes, which are based on Internet protocols. But who can actually understand this kind of explanation? A website is web data, with web pages and contents. To get a better understanding of what a website really is, we can start by knowing more about CMS. A ‘web content management system,’ CMS is a tool that processes many raw contents into useful resources in this content-filled world. This is the leading solution to building a website without any difficulties. Methods of protecting a website can differ completely depending on the beliefs of the startup CEO. One CEO may want to protect a site one way, and another CEO may think differently and protect a site another way. It all depends on their definition of what a website is to them. Here is a closer look at common assumptions CEOs have about websites.

1. ‘My website is powered by CMS’

CMS and all related plugin modules are website building and operating tools. Building security with an application can be done by secure coding. However, secure coding may not be perfect. That’s why CMS services release security patches and updates. Users need to constantly update. Still, a website can get ‘zero-day attacks,’ that brief period of vulnerability when the hacker can attack before the CMS vendor finds out.

The point here is that, not limited to CMS services themselves, users also need to pay attention and double-check every module to see whether it is really safe or not. Modules should only be downloaded from reliable, trustworthy websites. It can be quite bothersome to constantly update and still be vulnerable to attacks.

startup ceos think that CMS protect thier websites

2. ‘My website is all the data stored in the data center’

Technically, this is a pretty close answer. A website is data, and website data is stored at an Internet data center, IDC for short. To keep data safe, the data center administrator manages an application firewall and network security tools such as IDS/IPS to prevent hackers, viruses, and malicious codes from entering the data center.

Enterprises can usually afford to directly manage their own web server in the data center. But most startups can’t do this, so they rely on their hosting services to manage it for them with a lease of a partial web server in the data center. Cloud hosting services are popular among both small and medium businesses and larger enterprises. But if users use a cloud hosting service such as AWS, there is nothing the user can do about data center security. The data center will probably be safe, but the security is built around the server, and not the individual websites.

3. ‘My website is my own private data with web pages’

This is how startup CEOs should perceive their website. Understanding this concept is important because among security attacks on information, 90% of attacks are aimed at contents, through contents. Compared to the vulnerability of CMS and physical data storage, content vulnerability is a more serious matter. Website attacks are directed at the contents of a website. The contents are not necessarily images or files, but may include account information and administrative authority.

So, how can startup CEOs with CMS protect their websites?

Websites to a business can take on a completely different meaning from the average user. Startup CEOs might view a website as their gateway to the outside world. It is their vehicle to communicate their business and sell products. In essence, a website is a business. Most websites are powered by CMS systems and since there’s no way to know how secure CMS apps have been coded, they just need to constantly update the security patches provided by CMS to avoid attacks like SQL injections. Still not completely safe, CEOs need a web application firewall that covers all the vulnerabilities of CMS’s own security measures.

Even if a cloud-hosting service protects the web server or its data center, it does not protect the contents of individual websites. Basically, the data center manages the antivirus role and the network security role, but it does not take the web contents security role. Technical and privacy issues restrict it from securing web content.

A web application firewall (WAF), on the other hand, can fully protect website content. The cloud-based web application firewall Cloudbric can protect your website. Even if your data is stored safely on an IDC, or if you update security patches constantly on CMS, you still need a WAF to fully protect your website.


This blog post was originally featured on cloudbric.com. Visit their blog for more insight, news, and accessible information on web threats and trends. If you would like to learn more about Cloudbric’s logic-based WAF service, please contact info@cloudbric.com.

employee using laptop and coding injection

6 Steps to Create a Secure Website

There are roughly one billion active websites online, or one for every seven people alive right now. How about yours? Is it a secure website?

Every single second, a couple new websites are born into this world. That’s a lot of websites, so how are they being created, and how do you make one? And also, how do you keep your website secure from all the cyber threats out there?

A Secure Website in 6 Steps?

The steps needed for making a website, from registration to design, coding, operation and growth, can be a very long and complex process. Each step has a lot more nuance to it than fits here, but this guide should point you down the right path to setting up a secure website.

1. Choose Your CMS

How are you going to build your site? These days you don’t need to be a computer programmer to put together your own fully functioning website thanks to Content Management Systems (CMS). With CMS solutions like WordPress, Joomla, and Drupal, putting together a website is about as easy as building a house out of Lego. No matter what CMS you choose, there are new exploits that are uncovered almost on a weekly basis. This means you need to stay on top of software updates and patches to keep your site secure.

making a secure website with lego blocks like a house

2. Sign Up for a Web Host

Your domain name is like the street address and the CMS is like the materials you build your site with, but the web host is the actual plot of real estate where your website exists online. Some are free and come with bandwidth limitations or embedded ads, and there are commercial options that run much better. Many hosts also provide server security features which can better protect your uploaded website data. Check if a web host offers Secure File Transfer Protocol (SFTP) which makes uploading files much safer. Many good hosts should also allow for file backup services and have a public security policy showing how well they keep up to date on security upgrades.

3. Design Your Website With Security in Mind

What’s your website going to look like? Hiring a designer is usually worth the money you pay, but if your site is straightforward enough then you don’t need to do anything fancy. These days, simplicity is the golden rule, and minimizing add-ons and plug-ins is recommended for aesthetic, operational, and security concerns. The main thrust of your site should be text-based and presenting your product clearly, with images and design flourishes playing in the backup band. Basically you should focus more on avoiding bad design than embracing great design.

4. Apply a Web Application Firewall (WAF) to Protect Your Site

As soon as your website is online, it is exposed to a rogue’s gallery of cyber threats. Automated bots are out there scanning for vulnerable websites, and newly created sites are an especially tempting target. Adding a web application firewall (WAF) such as Cloudbric, Incapsula, or Cloudflare, will ensure that you have a secure website before the attacks start.

5. Do Business Online Secured by Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)ssl is like a handshake for a secure website coming out of a computer

If you’re going to have users registering on your website, and especially if there will be any kind of transaction, you need to encrypt that connection. Using SSL certificates creates a secure handshake between your website and clients’ devices, ensuring that no third party can covertly slip in between and monitor, hijack, or shut down any transactions taking place. GlobalSign is one good example of a widely available SSL certificate that pairs well with almost every website.

6. Grow as a Responsible, Respected Member of the World Wide Web

So you have a functioning. secure website protected from security threats, and you are engaged in commerce for your business. Now the main duty is to grow and reach more people! Reach out through SNS, set up your site so it can be indexed by search engines, and take advantage of SEO opportunities. The Internet is your oyster. But never lose track of your security needs, and focus on maintaining a reputation characterized by responsibility for cyber security matters.

Once you’ve finished these steps, your website is ready to make its mark on the Internet!


This blog post was originally featured on cloudbric.com. Visit their blog for more insight, news, and accessible information on web threats and trends. If you would like to learn more about Cloudbric’s logic-based WAF service, please contact info@cloudbric.com.